Этот веб-сайт использует файлы cookie. Если вы будете просматривать или пользоваться этим сайтом, вы даете на это свое согласие.
Отменить
Вы знаете, что реклама помогает FlightAware в отслеживании рейсов?
Вы можете внести свой вклад в бесплатную работу FlightAware, разрешив показ рекламы на FlightAware.com. Мы следим за тем, чтобы наша реклама была полезна и не мешала работе с сайтом. Вы можете быстро включить рекламу на FlightAware или приобрести привилегированное членство.
Отменить
Back to Squawk list
  • 18

MAP: More than 70 people have died in Colorado aircraft crashes since 2014. Here’s what the data tells us.

Размещено
 
Since 2014, 73 people have died in helicopter and airplane crashes in Colorado. The aircraft they were piloting or were passengers in went down for an array of reasons, from alcohol intoxication to mechanical malfunctions to human error. None of the crashes happened during a commercial flight. (coloradosun.com) Ещё...

Sort type: [Top] [Newest]


sledogpilot
Duane Mader 5
“Flying remains far safer than driving” because there were 2100 killed in car accidents vs. 70 in planes?
More car trips in one day in Denver than flights in Colorado for the year. Total lack of statistical awareness.
Love this journalistic gem:
“Centennial Airport south of Denver which is in a fast-growing heavily populated area that is fast growing.”
Chucojade
Chucojade 9
Marijuana use and flying? Ummmmm I do believe my ratings show Federal Aviation Administration not "State" of Colorado Aviation Administration where marijuana use may be legal. "Cessna 150" selfies by "Passengers" plural. Maybe I am being critical but this seems to be a poorly researched piece of news.
KathleenGillis
Kathleen Gillis 2
ianmcdonell
ian mcdonell 12
A very poor analysis filled with speculation that does not really help - more aimed at the sensational end of journalism
lynx318
lynx318 7
Journalist makes a point about women pilot numbers in Colorado, but no relevance to what it has to do with the accident statistics? Seems like sensationalism to me too.
mariofer
mariofer 3
Sadly I need to agree. Is there any other kind of journalism these days? I am afraid objective and concise journalism is a dying breed.
f4fntm
john doe 3
Somebody realized there's no money in it. Content in everything from websites to newspapers is simply a device that's needed to draw attention to one's real product: advertising.
joelwiley
joel wiley 1
Well, at least they did not conclude that the one factor in every one of the crashes was at fault. That was the ground.
tbpera
Tom Pera 4
Was a controller at South Lake Tahoe summer 0f 1975... we had a crash every 2 weeks... Sunday afternoon departures.. ... "Cessna 123, density altitude 9200 feet, wind 180 at 15 peak gust 25, caution turbulence and downdrafts over last 1/3 of runway, cleared for takeoff" then...as the Cessna tried to turn left to avoid downdraft (to the left is a ridge with over 30 crash sites)... "Cessna 123 suggest you continue straight ahead..after passing end of runway make a slight right turn to circle for altitude over the golf course...caution, there are 5 other airplanes circling there" ... was a zoo... biggest threat was first storms of the winter when pilots caught unaware... had a map in the tower...50 mile radius.. crash sites with red X... we'd get calls from pilots reporting debris ... most were from old sites...
vulcancruiser
Larry Loffelmacher 2
Mountains-turbulence-density altitude.....Kowabunga you're dead......
norjgix
Jonathan T-Cole 2
This still inquire for thorough investigation.
yr2012
matt jensen 3
debidesigns
Deb Dreyfuss 2
I think many of you missed the point. Read between the lines and it is totally “bad decision making”. VMC into IMC? Flying while impaired? Poor flight planning? No density altitude calculations? Low-flying hot-dogging? I don’t think the journalist was saying flying is bad, just pointing out the stupidity of some individuals who happen to be pilots. Most of us are careful planners, who take flying seriously, and have strict SOPs. I was taught to “fly like the professionals” even in the simplest aircraft. As we see from this article, there are always some who don’t.
tark12
Mary Ann Yavelow 2
Selfies and alcohol while piloting a plane?
LSCouch
Larry Couch 2
The question I have is: was this article the result of an assignment for a particular reporter to at least get something published. It reminds me of what happens when an English student needs to write a 2,000 word theme -- about 1,990 words are useless. Yes, the terrain in Colorado is more challenging because of mountains; but I think everyone knew that before starting to read the article.

Viperguy46
Jesse Carroll 1
A 1.75 liter of Whiskey in the Aero Star....Hmmmmm, it would take half that much for me to even take a ride in Ted Smith's "I wanna be an Aero Commander" machine!
Friend of mine who owned one called his the "Fastest, get ya killed beautiful bird" he ever owned!
Just saying!
gerardogodoy
gerardo godoy 1
linbb
linbb -8
So what is your point as they happen in every state and that one is no different? Pick any state and airplanes crash in them.
shawnconnelly
Shawn Connelly 22
I think the point is there are some unique challenges related to the topography of our state which some pilots do not take into account, even when they live here.
sledogpilot
Duane Mader 6
Probably the only valid point in the whole article.

Вход

Нет учетной записи? Зарегистрируйтесь сейчас (бесплатно) и получите доступ к конфигурируемым функциям, уведомлениям о статусе рейсов и другим возможностям!