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  • 44

Local procedures - The Potential Dangers

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I found this to be an interesting blog post on the potential hazards of being unfamiliar with local procedures, and debating whether these exceptions from FAA-established procedures should be allowed. (generalaviationnews.com) Ещё...

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joelwiley
joel wiley 10
Are 'local procedures' alternative facts?
TailspinT
TailspinT 6
A sad example of the problem with local procedures from one of the best military aviation writers ever.
https://thelexicans.wordpress.com/2016/02/23/the-worst-day-ever/
rartac
Robert Artac 4
Nothing irritates a professional pilot and crew more than "local procedures". Often known at "incorrect procedures". Best solution is to not have them, as inconvenient as it makes life to some.

That said, if you follow the AIM and do things in accordance, no one can fault you for their unofficial local tribal campfire knowledge non-compliance.
tjperez927
Tony Perez 4
If the Piper turning downwind was also monitoring CTAF, he should've heard "Branch County" and realized it's the same airport and watch for traffic; maybe even advise the inbound aircraft that Coldwater is the same as Branch County.
carlsonj
James Carlson 4
This is just insanity. We publish a document -- the Chart Supplement (formerly A/FD) -- that's supposed to contain reliable, official information about at least the public use airports and their local features so that pilots can access those airports. What's the point of publishing that document if the local people at those airports not only make up their own arbitrary and contrary rules, but also don't even bother publishing them?

That looks like a recipe for disaster, and it's just plain stupid.
DAL498
DAL498 2
if it's not published somewhere it shouldn't be done or used!
old51crow
Matthew Thrasher 2
I have neighbors that still refer to JFK as Idlewild Airport. Fortunately, they aren't piloting any sort of vehicle these days.
Rodster001
Rod Collen 2
I was flying IFR into KVUO and received a clearance for an approach at a different airport, KPDX VOR-A. Portland approach wouldn't give me the published LDA-A approach into KVUO because of the active runway at KPDX. I figured out later they use that approach because it overflies KVUO. As a transient pilot and newly IFR rated it was very confusing at the time because I couldn't find the approach plate! Luckily for me the weather was good enough that ATC was able to vector me below the clouds and I flew a visual into Pearson. I have never found anything published about this "procedure".
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
So, once long ago and far away in a galaxy named Oklahoma I was flying the NDB approach into a small airport east of OKC that once staged the national parachute jumpers championships. I was in a shiny new A36TC Banana and I don't remember the weather, but it wasn't particularly low and after I broke out of actual IMC I saw the runway and immediately saw things coming out of the clouds over it. As I got closer I realized these things were people under chutes. They were gracious enough to not land on the runway, as the last one touched down shortly before I did. Would you go around not knowing how many there were or where the jump plane was? Anyhow, I taxied to the ramp, got the boss in a rent car and on the way to bidness and went in search of the airport manager to inquire who their local FSDO was. As the jumpers were more than aware of how stupid I thought they were they voiced their displeasure when I told them I was looking for a phone to call said FSDO. No such thing as a cell phone back when. About this time the 182 jump plane that was kickin these guys out over the NDB taxis up and the pilot gets out. I told him what I was going to do and he said "go ahead, I heard you on the radio". So I did. And the ops. guy on the desk at said FSDO said "I'll call you back if I need any more info". He never did. I guess it was a local thing. I'm surprised I got outta there alive. Can't make this stuff up. Cheers
linbb
linbb 2
They are the ones in error and tough if they dont like it they have to use the correct name not some made up one. These type of items cause accidents, the only hope is someone taped it and you live thru it.
During my early days, 1963, of learning how to fly in the Seattle area as part of your training the instructor took you to the pig farm airport, we only called it that among other pilots never on the air.
rartac
Robert Artac 1
Addendum:

The word "unable" will get you out of any ATC request. Any.
Highflyer1950
Highflyer1950 1
All one has to do is call the airport by name, Branch County Regional Airport! It just happens that this is the only airport serving Coldwater, Mi. Now let's take Detroit, Michigan: it is served by more than one airport, you can't call them all Detroit! So look up the airport name that serves your destination and in this case it is Branch. You learn this stuff when you got a pilot licence so don't forget what you have learned. Now I will admit when flying into foreign airports in places like India, China, Indonesia, Russia and many more, their names can be quite a challenge to those who have issues with enunciation. It's all on the chart!
carlsonj
James Carlson 1
That sort of misses the point of the original article.

There are airports where the locals call the airport by a different name than the one actually published on the charts. That might seem like it's ok, and if it's a towered airport, it'll just give some momentary confusion. But for untowered airports, it's chaos on CTAF. CTAF is a party line -- a single frequency often serves a half dozen or more airports within earshot. So, when listening to position reports, how do you know which ones are important, if everyone is using an unfamiliar name?

On top of that, there are airports where, because of local airspace or terrain issues, the normal pattern entry is different from the one specified in the AIM. What do you do there? And if it's a new destination for you, how do you even find out that this could be an issue?
tbpera
Tom Pera 0
South Tahoe Airport 1975
"Tahoe Tower PSA 186 over Picketts Junction for landing"
"PSA 186 roger, report crossing Freel Peak"
PSA always having fun - used local AAA map for VFR arrival from south...we'd play along and make them scramble to find their next reporting point... all in fun... local procedure
kerimparrot
Mike Williams 0
I'm glad for you and me I have never been pilot.

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