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Новости и событияOvercoming Go-Around Hesitation

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Overcoming Go-Around Hesitation

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A 727 was approaching Ketchikan, Alaska, high and fast. Despite several warnings from the copilot, the captain elected to continue the visual approach. The airplane landed long and fast on the slush-covered runway, and the captain quickly deployed the spoilers and thrust reversers and applied maximum braking. (www.flyingmag.com) Ещё...

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onceastudentpilot
tim mitchell 5
we should go around.....Captain Go around.....I was flying planes when you were still in diapers.....oh crap I should have gone around #crash boom pow
jkudlick
Jeremy Kudlick 3
There's nothing wrong with admitting to yourself it's not quite right, then trying again.
sparkie624
sparkie624 3
It is always easier to go around than to have a carrier change to pushing up daisies....
preacher1
preacher1 3
So much for CRM with the copilot warning. Bulletproof captain. Serious enough that company policy even had it down as a no no. It's like anything else, there is a committment point and in this case, he not only screwed up but killed sombody in the process. Big time screwup.IMHO
HunterTS4
Toby Sharp 1
Wayne....I don't mean to be the lowly G.I. in Saving Private Ryan asking what "FUBAR" means..............but what exactly is IMHO......
HunterTS4
Toby Sharp 1
preacher1
preacher1 3
Boy you so bright we gonna have to put a tub over you so the sun will come up tomorrow.LOL
BenKFIT
Ben Lillie 2
Hey, preacher1, don't be too sarcastic...I didn't know what it meant either! LOL
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
LOL, that term is older than Preacher1 (and that is saying something :), Thought everyone knew that one.. Of course... Many miss the term "CFIT"... That is a naughty one in the Airline Industry.
preacher1
preacher1 3
Now Sparkie, you got me on that one. If it's too bad, send me an Email.LOL
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
As long as you have been flying, one simple aviation term... So that you will not think that I am pulling your leg, check it out at the link below, but don't try this with that nice new CRJ of yours :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CFIT
BenKFIT
Ben Lillie 3
Cool, now I know what CFIT means too :) I mean...I've heard about controlled flight into terrain, but I never knew the abbreviation for it. LOL
preacher1
preacher1 2
I'm kinda like Ben down here but had never hear that abb.lol
mhlansdell00
Mark Lansdell 2
It's not one you want to use often
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
Just don't go try it out... I can send you some pics of what it will look like if you do...
preacher1
preacher1 2
That wiki article is almost sarcastic but I can see by the examples it was happening often enough that a description had to be coined for it. You have to remember as well that in the mid 70's was when a lot of the new tecnologies were coming out and probably gave a false sense of security to some experienced pilot's. The thing was then to TRUST IT. It should have been as Reagn said, TRUST BUT VERIFY.lol
preacher1
preacher1 1
Probably used in the CHIT configuration at times
onceastudentpilot
tim mitchell 2
you shouldn't talk about yourself like that Thrustt but the first step to recovery is admitting that you have a problem
HunterTS4
Toby Sharp 2
If at first you don't succeed.......
WigzellRM
Ralph Wigzell 2
Hell, I enjoyed going around. What's up with these guys?
AgileFish
Aleksandar Bukal 2
"there is little or no mental or muscle memory of doing a go-around in normal flight operations, and no significant expectation that the approach might end in a go-around"

First go-around I executed was while practicing circuits in a 150. Tower rang up and told us to go around, moments later he cleared some IFR corporate aircraft to land on the intersecting runway.

Guess I'm an outlier.
indy2001
indy2001 2
Back in flight school, I was taught to EXPECT to go around. My instructor had all sorts of interesting ways to initiate it ... "There'a a scout troop camping on the runway" was one of my favorites. If you expect to go-around, then a normal landing is a pleasant surprise. Knowing in advance what you're going to do and being mentally prepared to do it are the keys. Then as the article says ... practice! I particularly like the idea of performing at least one G/A each month, and using that not-quite-right approach as an excuse to do it. It gives you an excellent explanation when you get back to the hangar or FBO.
THRUSTT
THRUSTT 2
Dust yourself off and try again...
SootBox
SootBox 2
...then skydiving probably isn't for you.
billindurham
Bill Watson 1
I first did them in a 150 too. Followed by 1500 hours of competitive glider flying and about 48 off field landings - no go around possible with no engine.
Then followed by 1000 hours of SEL tailwheel flying where I never did go arounds except in practice instrument approaches.
The point the article made was a good one, we need to practice them. It's easy to fall out of the habit thousands of hours later. I committed my self to do the practice.... but then was forced to do one on a night downwind landing into my home field last week. The outcome was never in doubt but I didn't do a very good job. Gotta practice a few ASAP!
ljlintner
Loren Lintner 1
Explains why CRM wasn't used. It happened in 1976 before we developed those brain cells.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19760405-0